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About the City of Morrow, Georgia

Welcome to Morrow

The City of Morrow has blended its appreciation of history and heritage with an excitement for the future. Although it has fewer than 7,000 residents, the city proudly claims:

  • - Clayton State University,
  • - Southeast Region Branch of the U.S. Archives,
  • - The main campus of the Georgia Archives,
  • - Reynolds Nature Preserve
  • - Spivey Hall, a world-renowned acoustically stunning performance facility.

The City of Morrow has made the transformation from rural railroad acreage to a modern arena for lovers of art, music, history and outdoor recreation. What will the City of Morrow become next? Come to Morrow and find out for yourself. Better yet, consider relocating to our diverse community and let Morrow star in your future.

History

In 1941, a twin-engine DC-3 came crashing into the then-unincorporated City of Morrow. On board was World War I Ace and President of Eastern Airlines, Captain Eddie Rickenbacker. The plane crashed just miles short of what is now Hartsfield-Jackson International Airport, then Candler Field. The tale of Rickenbacker's heroism as one of eight survivors spread across the country, bringing Morrow, which was once called a "small spit of land," to light as the Star of the Southern Crescent - the name of the livable cities forming an arch a few miles south of Georgia's capital city.

Morrow's journey from unhewn acreage to up-and-coming city center began in the early 19th century when a budding financier, Daniel Tyler, bought out the bankrupt Monroe Railroad and Banking Company and chartered his own business, the Macon and Western Railroad Company. Following 1820s Georgia Governor William Lumpkin's push for a rail system throughout the state, Tyler extended the tracks north into Atlanta, crossing through what is now the city of Morrow.

"Morrow Station," as it was then known, was named after Radford E. Morrow, a local plantation owner boasting more than 1,000 acres of land where his 12-room mansion stood on the corner of Morrow Road and Highway 54. Visit the crossroads today and you enter Morrow's municipal complex, a fitting location for the heart of the city. Tragically, Radford Morrow's home was engulfed in flames during Union leader William Tecumseh Sherman's "March to the Sea" during the Civil War.

Today, the City of Morrow blends its appreciation of history and heritage with an excitement for the future. Though it boasts fewer than 10,000 residents, the city claims state-of-the-art Clayton State University, a branch of the U.S. Archives, the main campus of the Georgia Archives, a wooded preserve and a world-renowned acoustically stunning performance facility, Spivey Hall.

The City of Morrow has transformed from rural railroad acreage to a modern arena for lovers or art, music, history and outdoor recreation. What will the City of Morrow become next? Come to Morrow and find out for yourself. Better yet, come stake your claim and let Morrow star in your future.

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Mission Statement

To create and maintain an environment that provides ethical leadership, exceptional services, and the highest quality of life for the citizens, employees, and customers of the City of Morrow.

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